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Welcome to my real estate website. I hope you enjoy your visit and explore everything my website has to offer, including St. Louis real estate listings, information for home buyers and sellers, and more about me, your professional St. Louis Realtor.

I am a realtor serving the St Louis Metropolitan area, and I have been serving St. Louis' Home Buyers and Sellers for 22 Years!

I am a CRS (Certified Residential Specialist), ABR (Accredited Buyer's Representative), and GRI (Graduate, Realtor Institute). 

I work with a wide range of clientele, from the first-time home buyer to the retiree, and I work heavily in the gay/lesbian community. I am a member of the St. Louis Association of Realtors (SLAR), Missouri Association of Realtors (MAR), National Association of Realtors (NAR), Member Real Estate Buyer's Agent Council (REBAC), Member Council of Residential Specialists (CRS).

My focus is in residential real estate sales - single family homes, investment properties, multi-family homes, condos, lofts, townhomes, etc. 

I work with both buyers and sellers.

If you know of anyone thinking of buying or selling a home, please tell them about me. I really do appreciate your referrals.

Visit my blog site: http://activerain.com/blogs/timtanz  for more info.

Looking for a new home? Check back here often to see our Featured Listings, or use my Dream Home Finder form and I'll conduct a personalized search for you.

If you're planning to sell your home in the next few months, nothing is more important than knowing a fair asking price. I would love to help you with a FREE Market Analysis. I will use comparable sold listings to help you determine the accurate market value of your home.

St Louis Real Estate,realtor,realty,gay real estate,Saint Louis,Missouri,glbt,home,buyer,seller,condo,loft,duplex,investment,agent,CRS,ABR, GRI

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Testimonials

I have sold four homes over my lifetime. Tim helped me sell my last home and his work made it easily the smoothest sale I've had. We listed it a bit early in March, but I had a full price offer about six weeks later. He helped arrange the inevitable small repairs/ changes prompted by the buyer's  inspection, helped clean up some last minute stuff, and dealt with my angst more times than I'd like to admit. I would recommend Tim to anyone selling their home. He knows the market, is great at helping advertise the home, and coordinates his work with the buyers' agent to make sure that nothing is left to chance. S. Kluth - 5149 Oakfire Dr.
Tim is very knowledge about the different areas in St. Louis City, St. Louis County, and St. Charles County. We couldn't have found a better agent to help us with finding our perfect forever home. We had very specific wants and needs with this home. Tim listened to us and helped us find homes to tour. He also offered great insight while looking for a home. He pointed thing out to us that we would not have considered. Such as having high ceilings verses vaulted. The added heating and cooling expense.

Tim always kept us informed along the way. Anytime I had a question he responded very quickly. Tim is considerate and personable. We feel you couldn't find a better agent to handle your real estate needs. Leslie M - 115 Bobcat Ct.
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Real Estate News!!!

Latest Realty News from NAR

Boom or Bust for Spring Homebuying?

Home prices reached an all-time high in most markets in 2018. Homeowners benefited greatly as a result, with their overall net wealth rising by a cool $1 trillion. A typical homeowner’s wealth is estimated to have reached $254,000 while that of a typical renter stood at only $5,000.  Looking ahead, home values are poised to advance further in 2019, albeit more modestly.  However, home sales slumped badly in the closing months of last year. Persistent sales declines are nearly always associated with dampening home prices and homes sitting on the market for a lengthier time.

Read the full article at Forbes >

State and Local Tax Deduction (SALT): The Impact by State

The state and local tax (SALT) deduction allows taxpayers to deduct state and local tax payments on their federal tax returns. The new tax law, called the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, instituted a cap on the SALT deduction. Starting from the 2018 tax year, the maximum SALT deduction that taxpayers are able to claim is up to $10,000. In contrast, before the new tax law, there was no limit. This blog focuses on what the reduced deduction means for taxpayers, especially in high-tax states like California, New York and New Jersey. However, let’s first understand how the state and local tax deduction works.

What is the state and local tax deduction?

Taxpayers who itemize their deductions, and therefore don’t take the standard deduction, can deduct what they’ve paid in certain state and local taxes. The SALT deduction includes property, income and sales taxes. To be more specific, a taxpayer who itemizes can deduct property taxes but the taxpayer needs to choose between deducting income and sales taxes. Taxpayers of states with high income taxes typically opt to deduct their state and local income taxes while taxpayers of states with high sales taxes typically deduct their sales taxes. Generally, taxpayers deduct property and income taxes using the SALT deduction.

Nationwide, 30 percent of the taxpayers used the SALT deduction, while the average SALT deduction was $12,540 in the 2016 tax year.

How will the reduced SALT affect taxpayers by each state?

Starting with the 2018 tax year, taxpayers’ SALT deductions are limited to $10,000. However, especially in high-tax states, itemizing taxpayers typically pay an amount higher than this limit. Let’s take a closer look at where most taxpayers claim the SALT deduction and how much they deduct on average.

NAR calculated the percentage of taxpayers that used the SALT deduction and the average deduction for 50 states and DC. In the 2016 tax year, the states with the highest percentage of taxpayers using the SALT deduction are in the Northeast and West regions. The percentage claiming the deduction ranged from 17 percent in West Virginia to 46 percent in Maryland in 2016. In the meantime, the average deduction ranged from $5,130 in Alaska to $21,780 in New York.

For instance, more than 40 percent of the taxpayers claimed the SALT deduction in California, New York and New Jersey while the average deductions in these three states were all over $18,000.

SALT deduction by income level

While the SALT deduction is used across all income levels, the amount of SALT deductions by lower, middle, and upper income taxpayers provides insight into how those taxpayers benefit. Nationwide, almost 40 percent of taxpayers earning between $50,000 to $75,000 per year and more than 70 percent of taxpayers earning $100,000 to $200,000 per year used the SALT deduction. For income brackets above $200,000, almost all of those upper income taxpayers claimed the deduction.

When looking at the total amount deducted by income bracket, it is clear that the SALT deduction benefits taxpayers across all brackets. Specifically, taxpayers earning more than $100,000 deducted above $10,000 (the new limit) on average. These taxpayers represent 14 percent of all taxpayers nationwide.

For more detail information and to scroll across the various parts of the U.S., see below:

 

Wealth Gains from Homeownership across Metro Areas in 2018

Homeownership has been associated with positive social outcomes[1], and is also the largest source of wealth among homeowning households. In 2016, the median net worth among homeowners was $231,400, with housing wealth making up 85 percent of wealth (average net housing wealth was $197,500).[2]

Housing wealth contributes positively to the homeowner’s and children’s economic condition, because home equity can be tapped for expenditures such as investing in another property (which can generate rental income), home renovation (which further increases the home value), a child’s college education, emergency or major life events, or expenses in retirement.[3]

Housing wealth (or net worth or equity) is built up over time via the home price appreciation and the principal payments that the homeowner makes on the loan.[4]  The chart shows the change in housing wealth (equity) as of 2018 for a home buyer who purchased a typical single-family existing home in the United States 5, 10, 15, or 30 years ago. Over these holding periods, most of the wealth gains are from the appreciation in home values. For example, if one purchased a home five year ago (2013), a home buyer would have typically gained $79,488 in wealth (equity), of which $64,200, or 81 percent is from the home price appreciation ($197,400 in 2013 to $261,600 in 2018).  Homeowners who move typically do so in 10 years, so a homeowner who bought a home 10 years ago (2008) would have $91,081 in home equity gains as of 2018).[5] The longer the holding period, the larger the increase in wealth due to home price appreciation and the cumulative principal payments, which reduce the loan balance.

If you had purchased a home just five years ago in these metro areas, here are the typical gains in home equity that you have due to home price appreciation and the principal payments you’ve made[6]:

Metro areas with home equity gains of $200,000 or over for a home purchased 5 years ago:

  • San Jose-Sunnyvale-Sta. Clara: $620, 410
  • San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward: $393,561
  • Boulder, CO:  $264,395
  • Anaheim-Sta. Ana-Irvine, CA: $218,773
  • Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, CA: $216,613
  • San Diego-Carlsbad, CA: $205,659

 

Metro areas with lowest equity gains (loss) for a home purchased 5 years ago:

  • Atlantic City-Hammonton, NJ: ($8,593)
  • New Jersey City-White Plains, NJ-NY: $3,336
  • Cumberland, MB-WV: $6,215
  • Trenton, NJ: $7943
  • Elmira, NY: $8,705

Use this data visualization to explore the typical increase in housing wealth across metro areas as of 2018 if you purchase a home 5, 10, 15, 30 years ago. These are typical gains and are illustrative of the magnitude of the wealth gains over time. Actual wealth gains will vary by property:


[1] Lawrence Yun and Nadia Evangelou, Social Benefits of Homeownership and Stable Housing, Realtor® University The Journal of the Center for Real Estate Studies; https://realtoru.edu/real-estate-studies/journal/

[2] Federal Reserve Board, 2016 Survey of Consumer Finances

[3] Brad Finkelstein, 7 reasons why consumers are tapping into home equity, The American Banker, June 26, 2018; https://www.americanbanker.com/7-reasons-why-homeowners-are-tapping-into-their-home-equity

[4] The price appreciation can be thought of as ‘capital gains’ while the principal payments can be thought of as a conversion from liquid asset (cash) to an illiquid asset (house).

[5] To be clear, these are changes in wealth or home equity between two time period or over n holding periods. If one wants the level of the home equity at a point in time, one has to add the down payment.

[6] These calculations are illustrative of the magnitude of the housing wealth gains; actual change in home equity will vary by home.

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Tim Tanz, CRS, GRI, ABR
1034 S Brentwood Blvd
Suite 750
St Louis, MO 63117
Phone: 314-974-4886
Email: tim@timtanzhomes.com

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